Webinars

The ICNet has offered a webinar series on climate science and transportation engineering since 2013. Topics include climate projections and downscaling, sea level rise modeling, bridge monitoring, and the Boston central artery, among others. Webinars are listed below in their primary category but often are applicable to more than one area.

Climate and Engineering Foundational KnowledgeDownscaling Climate Model OutputSea Level RiseProjects and StudiesFederal and State Agency Perspectives

High-Res Climate Projections WebinarTitle: High-Resolution Climate Projections: Where Do They Come From and What Can We Do With Them?

Introduction: This webinar is strongly recommended for any engineer or planner who will be working climate models or climate model data. Katharine Hayhoe, Texas Tech University (September 2013)

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Climate Change in the NE US webinarTitle: Climate Change in the Northeast U.S.: Past, Present, and Future

Introduction: An overview of the projected impacts of climate change in the Northeast. Cameron Wake, University of New Hampshire (October 2013)

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Current State webinarTitle: The Current State of Infrastructure Engineering and Climate Science

Introduction: Climate change and sea level rise analyses and adaptation planning are rapidly becoming part of infrastructure engineers’ world purview. This webinar will quickly get you up to speed on what on what we know and don’t know about the intersection of infrastructure engineering and climate change on the regional and national landscape. Recent findings from national reports will be presented including those from the NCHRP, AASHTO, ASCE, GAO and NCA as well as a fresh perspective about how this connects to regional practice and research needs. Jennifer Jacobs, University of New Hampshire (April 2014)

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dynamical downscaling webinarTitle: Dynamical Downscaling: How can Global Climate Models help inform Local Adaptation?

Introduction: This webinar provides an overview of dynamical downscaling as a method to extract fine-scale information from global climate projections. Dynamical downscaling uses physically-based numerical models to achieve a finer spatial resolution. The webinar will survey the physical and mathematical basis for dynamical downscaling along with the advantages and disadvantages of dynamical downscaling relative to other methods for deriving fine-scale information from coarser-scale climate projections. Ray Arritt, Iowa State University (March 2015)

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statistical downscaling webinarTitle: Empirical-Statistical Downscaling: Unpacking Pandora’s Box

Introduction: How do we convert the relatively coarse information we get from global climate models into high-resolution projections: over a fine grid, or for individual weather stations; at daily, or even hourly, time scales? Empirical-statistical downscaling (ESD) is the most common approach used to generate high-resolution climate projections for impact assessment. This webinar will begin with a brief overview of the main types of ESD before digging deeper into the specific techniques being used to generate the projections provided by the Infrastructure Climate Network and used in the U.S. National Climate Assessment. Katharine Hayhoe, Texas Tech University (December 2014)

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Storm Surge WebinarTitle: Storm Surge Risk Modeling and Coastal Engineering Adaptations in a Changing Climate

Introduction: An accurate and precise assessment of the exceedance probability of storm surge water surface elevations, provided at high spatial resolution, helps decision makers identify areas of existing vulnerability requiring immediate action, as well as, areas that benefit from future vulnerability planning. Armed with this detailed information, adaptation strategies and coastal engineering alternatives can be developed that address present and future risks. Coastal protection and flood management alternatives include, but are not limited to, structural alternatives, adaptable and modular engineering concepts, flood proofing, bioengineered technology, managed retreat/relocation, elevating, flow control structures, and evacuation plans. These concepts provide alternatives and planning approaches to mitigate, minimize, or adapt to effects of sea level rise and storm events. Kirk Bosma, Woods Hole Group (May 2014)

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Forecasting Coastal Impacts WebinarTitle: Forecasting Coastal Impacts Using Uncertain Sea-level Rise Projections

Introduction: The understanding of sea-level rise (SLR) processes has improved significantly over the past 15-20
years. Contributions from ice sheets and ocean dynamics are increasingly well-understood, and global budgets better constrained. In addition to physically-based models, semi-empirical methods, and more recently expert elicitations are also available to describe potential SLR. In spite of these advances, there is still large uncertainty in the magnitude and timing of SLR over the next century and beyond. How much and how fast sea-level may rise can be a significant determinant of management actions in both natural and built environments. Assessing the potential vulnerability of the coastal zone to SLR requires integrating a variety of physical, biological, and social factors. A variety of approaches to SLR planning can be used, such as probabilistic assessments, alternative scenarios, and analogs to past conditions. Rob Thieler, USGS, Woods Hole, MA (February 2014)

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Title: Northeast US flood mechanisms, hydroclimatic trends, and implications for hydrologic design

Introduction: In this presentation we will describe known major flood-generating mechanisms in the Northeast US. We will also summarize our research, and research by others, on how flood magnitudes and frequencies have changed as a consequence of historical hydroclimatic changes. Potential implications of past trends and future changes for designing floodplain infrastructure will also be reviewed.
Glenn Hodgkins, USGS New England Water Science Center, and Mathias Collins, NOAA Fisheries (March 2016)

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FHWA-MassDOT WebinarTitle: FHWA-MassDOT pilot project: Climate Change and Extreme Weather Vulnerability Assessments and Adaptation Options of the Central Artery/Tunnel (CA/T) system in Boston, MA

Introduction: This webinar presents the approach that was developed, the obstacles that were overcome, and the lessons that were learned as vulnerabilities and recommended actions were identified for this highly complex and critical transportation system. A high-resolution, coupled hydrodynamic-wave model (ADCIRC/SWAN) was developed to simulate flooding due to the combined influences of sea level rise, storm surge from hurricanes and Nor’easters, wave action and tides using a Monte Carlo approach.. Composite flood distributions were developed at each model node to assign flood depth exceedance probabilities for the purpose of risk-based planning and design. Both regional and local adaptation strategies to mitigate identified vulnerabilities were recommended. Ellen Douglas, University of Massachusetts Boston (May 2015)

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Incorp Structural Health WebinarTitle: Incorporating Structural Health Monitoring and a Changing Climate into Bridge Design

Introduction: The principal objective of this webinar is to demonstrate how including structural monitoring and predicted climate scenarios in bridge design and maintenance protocols can increase the service life and robustness of a transportation network. Several case studies are presented. Erin Bell, University of New Hampshire (February 2015)

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Climate Adaptation and Scearios WebinarTitle: Climate Adaptation and Scenarios: Planning for the Built Environment

Introduction: An adaptation strategy is a set of local and regional proactive actions implemented by public and private organizations to manage systems, over time and space, which are vulnerable to present and future climate conditions. The planning process includes: (1) a vulnerability assessment, (2) selection of actions that are robust and/or flexible and adjustable with implementation tied to critical thresholds, (3) climate change scenario analysis , (4) integration with the natural and social environments, and (5) evaluation with multiple criteria. Multiple methods can be used to generate and evaluate adaptation strategies. Several case studies are presented. Paul Kirshen, University of New Hampshire (October 2014)

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Climatic Change Impacts webinarTitle: Climatic Change Impacts on Future Pavement Performance and Maintenance Costs

Introduction: The performance of a pavement is significantly impacted by environmental factors. Rising air temperature, higher rainfall, and flooding due to sea level rise or extreme weather events can inflict significant damage to pavements. This webinar considers the effects of climate change in the planning, design, construction,and maintenance of pavement. Jo Sias Daniel, University of New Hampshire and Rajib Mallick, Worcester Polytechnic Institute (October 2013)

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NIST webinarTitle: NIST Community Resilience Program

Introduction: The presentation provides an overview of the NIST Community Resilience Program, with an emphasis on the recently released Community Resilience Planning Guide for Buildings and Infrastructure Systems and opportunities for engagement with the NIST program through the Disaster Resilience Standards Panel. The presentation also describes NIST’s research in the field of Community Resilience and expected outcomes. Stephen Cauffman, NIST (June 2015)

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FWHA efforts webinarTitle: FHWA Efforts with Respect to Resilience in Operations and Maintenance

Introduction: In the fall of 2012, the FHWA’s Office of Operations produced the paper, “Planning for Systems Management & Operations as part of Climate Change Adaptation.” The presentation addresses the “services and operations” portion of the USDOT policy statement, highlighting potential issues, challenges, and approaches for State DOTs and local operating agencies to consider under shifting climate-related conditions. The scope of operations of the presentation is limited to surface transportation activities and does not include air or water-borne transportation. Laurel Radow, Federal Highway Administration (April 2015)

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Coping with Climate at MainDOT webinarTitle: Coping with Climate at MaineDOT: Planning, Practice and Policy

Introduction: Translating climate change predictions into design standards is greatly complicated by the large uncertainty inherent in such predictions. Absent climate change, the usual design methods are already characterized by significant uncertainty; climate change predictions exacerbate the problem. In this webinar we explore how MaineDOT is supporting the development of a benefit-cost model for optimizing project design subject to possible future climate scenarios. Charlie Hebson and Judy Gates, MaineDOT Environmental Office (March 2014)

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If there is a issue with a webinar, please let us know at [email protected]